Meditation is not a Selfish Practice

We are faced with so much suffering in life, especially full with turmoil, destruction and with grief in this season, in the late Summer of 2017. Several powerful hurricanes have devastated, flooded and killed in North America, in the Caribbean, in the Southern United States, especially Texas and Florida, and in Baja California, Mexico. Now a terrible earthquake has struck near Mexico City, burying hundreds beneath collapsed buildings, including hundreds of innocent children trapped beneath their very own school. This is tragedy and suffering that seems too much for us to bear. Too much to even witness. Our compassion tears open our hearts for all those affected.

There are those who have been waiting to receive personal instruction from me in Cuernavaca, just south of Mexico City. This is to happen very soon. And this raises an important question: To many persons it may appear that practicing meditation seems a selfish or self-centered practice. To sit for a few minutes each day and go within our own selves, to contact our own Source-Place of Consciousness deep within: How can we do that when there is so much trauma, disruption and suffering going on?

It is an important question. These events in our communities call for all of us who are able to rise to the challenges of helping our communities and our neighbors. And I mean this from an entirely global perspective, for we are all neighbors. We are all one community. No, we cannot all be rescue workers on the scene. But we all can offer our support and compassion in one way or another.

But the practice of deep meditation (Neelakantha Meditation) does something very valuable, important and irreplaceable, not just for ourselves, but for our communities and ultimately for the world.

Human life is filled with suffering, just as the Buddha and so many other teachers have taught. Everything we witness and experience, every trauma, every loss and every suffering leaves a trace within the fabric of our deepest mind. This affects us. Even if the suffering is happening to others, and we experience it just by witnessing it, seeing and feeling it. It leaves a trace impression in our minds too.

Neelakantha Meditation is a practice of effortlessly going deep within our own selves and accessing the very highest Source-Consciousness within. It is our own true and imperishable highest Self. It is beyond all relative human activity and dwells eternally in its own state of perfect Wholeness and Bliss. We access this and drink from it, are nourished and uplifted by this, every time we sit and do our meditation. It is of the character of Divine Grace. This aspect or value of Consciousness is called “Soma”. It is the nectarean power of healing and wholeness. It is imperishable (amrita) and cannot be tarnished, diminished nor destroyed. It acts always to release the traces of suffering from what we have experienced in life. It does not erase our experiences: What happened in life did happen. The loss, pain and the grief are real. But the wounds in the heart begin to heal when the traces of suffering are released. We are in the end left with only the wisdom, the compassion and the love that remains. Though this will often take place progressively over some time. That is our practice. It is this that enables our very presence and highest benevolent intentions to support, hold, and uplift our neighbors and communities. From this we become more capable of holding them in the highest Light and Love of Consciousness.

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We face the storms together, supported by the Highest from within.

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